nbcnews:

Lie Back and Relax: Orangutan submits to exam after shooting
(Photo: Sutanta Aditya / AFP - Getty Images)
A staff member conducts a medical exam on a 14-year-old male orangutan found with air gun pellets embedded in his body at the Sumatran Orangutan Conservation Center in Indonesia on Wednesday.
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That is so surreal …

nbcnews:

Lie Back and Relax: Orangutan submits to exam after shooting

(Photo: Sutanta Aditya / AFP - Getty Images)

A staff member conducts a medical exam on a 14-year-old male orangutan found with air gun pellets embedded in his body at the Sumatran Orangutan Conservation Center in Indonesia on Wednesday.

Continue reading

That is so surreal …

thatweirdo-intheduckieshirt:

tramampoline:

krudman:

racconconnoisseur:

themysteryofgravityfalls:

Fix it! Do it! Accidentally unscrew it! It’s time to fix things with Soos!

I can’t get enough of the terrible after effects

It took me a good while to realize I was not watching youtube poop, and that’s just perfect.

I’m so happy Disney understands the importance of mini webisodes between seasons

Gravity Falls is the besssssst

Of course the understand the importance of mini episodes … It’s been how long since we had an actual season?

dionsaursaysrawr:

dionsaursaysrawr:

Who ever reblogs this will get a random fact from this book sent anonymously into their ask

Hey you guys should reblog it I want something to do

dionsaursaysrawr:

dionsaursaysrawr:

Who ever reblogs this will get a random fact from this book sent anonymously into their ask

Hey you guys should reblog it I want something to do

reagan-was-a-horrible-president:

universalequalityisinevitable:

An undeniably large part of what keeps poverty going is the fact that there are people who think that if they vote with the rich they’ll somehow magically become the rich. The trouble is, rich people don’t vote. They own.

"Socialism never took root in America because the poor see themselves not as an exploited proletariat, but as temporarily embarrassed millionaires." 

(Quote attributed to John Steinbeck but is under dispute. Regardless, it’s still true.)

Thus proving that Futurama is the best social commentary on the planet.

policymic:

New ‘Extremely Large Telescope’ will help us find possible alien life

Called the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT), the gigantic device will “look further back into the history of the universe than any other astronomical device in existence.” It will be built atop a 10,000-ft mountain called Cerro Armazones, which has the perfect conditions to provide a clear, unobstructed view of the stars.

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spaceexp:

Shooting the Milky Way with Friends in Cedar Key, Fl Source: only_eats_plankton (reddit)

spaceexp:

Shooting the Milky Way with Friends in Cedar Key, Fl

Source: only_eats_plankton (reddit)

I’m probably not quite as punk as I think I am …

expressions-of-nature:

Two Cracked Worlds | Death Valley | alierturk [Deviant Art] [Facebook] [500px] [Website]

expressions-of-nature:

Two Cracked Worlds | Death Valley | alierturk [Deviant Art] [Facebook] [500px] [Website]

jtotheizzoe:

Another New Earth… Or Not.
You may have heard the news last week that astronomers discovered the best candidate to date for an Earth-like planet. Kepler-186f is a rocky planet that is, like other so-called “second Earths”, the right distance away from its parent star to have liquid water on its surface and maybe have the right conditions for maybe having life if that’s the kind of thing that maybe exists somewhere else… maybe.
As Adam Mann writes for WIRED, there’s a lot we don’t know about this exoplanet, and a lot that makes it not very Earth-like. Like the fact that its star is way different from ours. And that we haven’t imaged it directly. Matt Francis adds his two cents at The Daily Beast, noting that a planet that close to its parent star is tidally locked, with the same side facing, and being baked by, its parent star all the time. Sounds like it’s more of an Earth-cousin at best.
It’s not right to call this planet a “New Earth” (and I can almost guarantee that the Face of Boe does not and will not ever live there), because there’s just too much that we don’t know about it. The same goes for other exoplanets: For every question they answer they force us to ask three more. But that’s science. What is cool about this latest discovery is that it shows us just how many types of stars, even weird ones like the M class red dwarf that 186f orbits, can harbor Earth-ish planets in their habitable zone. 
The more we discover, the stronger the case that life exists somewhere, elsewhere. If you’d like to know more about our search for exoplanets and the life we hope they harbor, I did two videos on that for IOTBS. Watch ‘em below:
Exoplanets: Are There Other Earths?

Is There Intelligent Life Beyond Earth?

(Image via NASA)

jtotheizzoe:

Another New Earth… Or Not.

You may have heard the news last week that astronomers discovered the best candidate to date for an Earth-like planet. Kepler-186f is a rocky planet that is, like other so-called “second Earths”, the right distance away from its parent star to have liquid water on its surface and maybe have the right conditions for maybe having life if that’s the kind of thing that maybe exists somewhere else… maybe.

As Adam Mann writes for WIRED, there’s a lot we don’t know about this exoplanet, and a lot that makes it not very Earth-like. Like the fact that its star is way different from ours. And that we haven’t imaged it directly. Matt Francis adds his two cents at The Daily Beast, noting that a planet that close to its parent star is tidally locked, with the same side facing, and being baked by, its parent star all the time. Sounds like it’s more of an Earth-cousin at best.

It’s not right to call this planet a “New Earth” (and I can almost guarantee that the Face of Boe does not and will not ever live there), because there’s just too much that we don’t know about it. The same goes for other exoplanets: For every question they answer they force us to ask three more. But that’s science. What is cool about this latest discovery is that it shows us just how many types of stars, even weird ones like the M class red dwarf that 186f orbits, can harbor Earth-ish planets in their habitable zone.

The more we discover, the stronger the case that life exists somewhere, elsewhere. If you’d like to know more about our search for exoplanets and the life we hope they harbor, I did two videos on that for IOTBS. Watch ‘em below:

Exoplanets: Are There Other Earths?

Is There Intelligent Life Beyond Earth?

(Image via NASA)

My hair wasn’t dark enough so I took care of that today!

My hair wasn’t dark enough so I took care of that today!

Some late photos of the eggs we painted for Easter!